Georgia O'Keefe large flowers painted acrylics art workshop one off bespoke paintings garden gallery studio

My Influences:- Georgia O'keefe

Good Morning,

I hope you are well this Monday morning in the middle of August.

Welcome to Monday's blog which is about an artist who has had a huge influence on my art practice.

Georgia O'Keefe painted the most amazing flowers in an abstract style. Her colours, pattern, and composition were beautifully orchestrated.

Workshops:-

The weekend workshop is only 2 weeks away. If you fancy a creative-filled weekend which includes all your materials, tuition, lunches, afternoon cream tea & wine, why not spoil yourself?

Go to the weekend workshop page for more information and booking details.

Art Club:-

Thursday  19th August/ 2nd September  2 - 4 pm

Come along with your own project to work in a relaxed atmosphere with plenty of advice, tea & coffee on hand.

 

Georgia O'Keefe 1887- 1986:-

  • She was born in Wisconsin in 1887. Her childhood home was a large dairy farm.
  • She married the photographer Alfred Stieglitz, the man who first exhibited her work.
  • In the 1920s O'Keefe spent the winter in New York working in a studio on the 28th floor. She loved the skyscrapers and often drew these, but felt increasingly cut off from nature, so began to paint flowers in 1924.
  • One Art critic wrote:- O'keefe's magnified flowers, whose swooping forms of petals and stamen fill the entire surface of the canvas, have the amplitudes of the landscape itself.
  • O'Keefe never changed her mind once she had begun work on a piece. Corrections would have dulled the vibrant colours.
  • There is no attempt to capture the texture of the plant or precise details. Instead, O'keefe has concentrated on the shapes, rhythms, and patterns, filling in the space with the most delicate hues.
  • In some of her paintings, the flower becomes almost abstract as she fills the surface with sweeps of delicate colour.
  • The beauty of the work lies in the rhythmical lines, the delicacy of the pattern and in the subtlety of the colours.

 

 

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